SHOPPING CART
SHELTER INSTITUTE FAQ

Should I bring my own tools?
Each of the different classes have their own requirements. In particular, you will need a complete set of your own tools for the Post and Beam Class (complete list here). For the more comprehensive two, three, and fifteen week classes, the requirements are not as strict, but useful tools include:

calculator that can calculate square root
notebook
writing implements
drafting equipment (will be provided)
camera (believe it or not, people have forgotten this)
hand saw, portable drill, sliding T-bevel, tape measure, chisel, hand plane (Saw Horse workshop)
hammer, tool belt for work on-site (optional)

Where will I stay?
When you register for a class at the Shelter Institute, we send you our housing list which offers about forty special places to stay within commuting distance of our campus. Prices start at $100 per week for a room in one of our host's homes. You may decide to rent a cottage near the water for $400 or more per week. Some of our students choose to camp or even bring their own RV to stay in. And, of course, there are hotels and motels near by. You choose accommodations that suit your particular needs. A car is very helpful, but some more ambitious students have gotten by with a bicycle.

What about meals?
In the same way that our students stay in a wide variety of places, they eat a wide variety of foods. There are many restaurants within 5 miles of the campus. There is a grocery store, convenience store, and pizza place about one mile down the road. Many people bring bag lunches and prepare meals while they are here. Some accommodations come with kitchen privileges. There are also several evening events during our classes. The three-week class typically sees a night out at a local restaurant as a group, an evening barbecue, and a final pot luck supper. Bring what you like to eat, and be prepared to share.

What clothing should I bring?
One sure thing about the weather in Maine is that you can never be sure what it will be. Check out the individual class you are considering for a general description of weather conditions at that time of year. But, in general, come prepared for cold as well as warm. We have had 50-degree days in January and 20 degree days in June. Clothing that can be worn in layers is very helpful.

What credits will I earn by attending the Shelter Institute class?
Graduates of the three-week design build class can use their diploma towards college credits, teacher certification credits, real estate certification credits, or VA work programs. Officially, the Shelter Institute three week design/build class is accredited through the University of Maine at Augusta (UMA) Physics department as the equivalent of a one-semester class (4 credit-hours). Upon graduation, we can provide you with the necessary paperwork to register your credits. There is a nominal administrative fee that goes to the University of Maine (approximately $25).

Does Shelter allow students to visit from other countries? How does an international student register for a course?
We've had customers and students visit Shelter from Europe, Asia, Australia, and Latin America. Recently, we've had students from Germany, Brazil, New Zealand, Poland, Spain, and France. Please understand that some of our instructors are quite adept French speakers, but all courses are taught in English.

Unfortunately, we've had some challenges with credit card orders originating from outside the U.S. Our merchant account security settings are robust, and as such we can not process orders online if the customer is using a non-U.S. bank, if the billing address is international, or in some circumstances if the computer is located abroad.

If you would like to register for a Shelter Institute course and are outside of the country, please contact us via email or by phone. We will be happy to process your payment manually by phone or by an alternate electronic method. Thank you for your understanding.

Changes to ASHRAE Ventilation Standard
Isaac Asimov wrote "Science gathers knowledge faster than society gathers wisdom." We have seen this play out countless times in residential construction: double pane windows with seals that failed within a few years creating 'obscurred glass', vapor barriers installed on the wrong side of the wall ... READ MORE